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Full text of "School catalog, School of Dance, 1978-1979"

mmummmEm 

COLLEGE OFTHE 

250 SOUTH BROAD STREET, PHILADELPHIA. PENNSYLVANIA 19102 



DANCE CATALOG 



Bernard Reder. Harp Player ,11. 1960. bronze. 
84 X 48 X 54 inches. Collection 
of Whitney Museum of American Art. 



PHILADELPHIA COLLEGE OF THE PERFORMING ARTS 
SCHOOL OF DANCE 

CURRICULUM CATALOG 

AND 
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

1978-1979 



DEGREE PROGRAMS 

B.F.A. (BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS) 

The B.F.A. program is designed for those 
students who desire to prepare for professional 
performing and/or choreographing careers in 
dance. The Bachelor of Fine Arts program 
normally takes four years of full-time study 
to be completed and carries a total graduation 
requirement of 132-133 credits, depending on 
the major field of study. Twenty-four of 
these credits are taken in the liberal arts 
studies and thirteen are taken in music studies, 
Graduation requirements for all dance majors 
include the successful completion of the 
Performance requirement. 



B.F.A. in DANCE EDUCATION 

(BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS IN DANCE ED.) 

This is a five year program which is specifically 
designed for those students whose primary 
intention is to enter the dance profession as a 
teacher of dance. Although there is currently 
no state certification for dance teachers, this 
program of study does include a semester of 
supervised classroom practical teaching in 
schools and/or private studios. Those students 
electing this program must meet all of the 
requirements for the B.F.A. In addition, they 
must complete specific courses designed for the 
professional educator. The total requirement 
for graduation from this program is 165-156 
credits. 



-1- 



ASSOCIATE DEGREE 

This is a two year program which is designed 
specifically for those students who wish to 
concentrate on dance studies without completing 
a general studies requirement. The thrust of 
this program is to give the student concentrated 
study in the broad spectrum of dance styles 
and to develop his/her familiarity, proficiency 
and performing ability in these styles. Graduation 
requirements include the successful completion 
of prescribed course of study and the fulfillment 
of the performance requirement. 



MAJOR AREAS OF STUDY 

The following is a list of the major dance styles 
which can be elected as a course of study once 
the core curriculum is completed. Each student 
must select one of these areas in which to con- 
centrate his/her studies after the completion 
of the second year of matriculation in the B.F.A. 
or B.F.A. in Dance Education program. 

1. Ballet 

2. Modern Dance 

3. Theater Dance 



-2- 



SCHOOL OF DANCE 
CORE CURRICULUM 



I 



0101 Ballet I 

01 03 Modem Dance I 

0105 Notation I 

0107 Eurythmics I 

*Dance Elective 

Ml 01 Intro, to Music 

DPI 01 Functional Music 

LA150 English Composition 



II 



3 


01 02 


Ballet II 


3 


3 


0104 


Modern Dance II 


3 




D106 


Notation II 






01 08 


Eurythmics II 






0110 


Dance Ethnology 








♦Dance Elective 






Ml 02 


Intro, to Music 




3 


DPI 02 


Functional Music 




16 


LAI 51 


Intro, to Lit. 


3 
TIT 



III 

0201 Ballet III 

D203 Modern Dance III 

D205 Notation III 

0207 Dance Pedagogy I 

0209 Anatomy for Dancers 

0211 Dance History I 

D217 Improvisation I 

DP201 Functional Music 

LA250 Personality & 

Creativity 



IV 



3 


0202 


Ballet IV 


3 


3 


0204 


Modern Dance IV 


3 


1 


D206 


Effort/Shape 


1 


2 


D208 


Dance Pedagogy II 


2 


2 


D210 


Kinesiology 


2 


2 


0212 


Dance History II 


2 


1 


0218 


Improvisation II 


1 


1 


DP202 


Functional Music 


1 




LA251 


Science & the Arts 


3 


3 






Id 


16 









* Offered in both semesters 

DANCE ELECTIVES: Dill Spanish, D112 Jazz, 0114 Ethnic Dance, 0115 Mime, 0116 Character 



PERFORMANCE MAJOR 
BALLET 



VI 



D301 Ballet A 
D303 Modern Dance B 
D307 Ballet Repertory I 
D309 Partnering I 
K315 Electronic Music 
0P317 Acting I 
LA350 Arts in Hist. 



5 
2 
2 
1 
3 
1 
3 

"IT" 



D302 Ballet A 

D304 Modern Dance B 

D308 Ballet Repertory II 

D310 Partnering II 

D322 Score Reconstruction 

D324 Character Dance 

LA351 Aesthetics 



5 

2 
2 
1 
1 
1 
3 

TT 



VII 



VIII 



0401 Ballet A 5 

D403 Modern Dance B 2 

D417 Ballet Repertory III 2 

D419 Theatre Functions 2 

D409 Ballet Hist. 2 

LA-- Elective 3 



0402 Ballet A 
0404 Modern Dance B 
0408 Ballet Repertory IV 
*D420 Dance Production 

LA— Elective 



5 
2 

2 
2 

3 



Total Credits: 132 



♦Includes preparation for performance requirement. 



D303 Modern Dance A 

D301 Ballet B 

D317 Dance Composition I 

D305 Modern Repertory I 

K315 Electronic t^sic 

0P317 Acting I 

LA350 Arts in Hist. 



PERFORMANCE MAJOR 

MODERN DANCE 



VI 

D304 Modern Dance A 5 

D302 Ballet B 2 

D318 Dance Composition II 2 

D306 Modern Repertory II 2 

0322 Score Reconstruction 1 

LA3S1 Aesthetics 3 



15" 



VII 



VIII 



D403 Modern Dance A 5 

D401 Ballet B 2 

D417 Dance Composition III 2 

D405 Modern Repertory III 2 

041 9 Theatre Functions 2 

LA— Elective 3 



0404 Modern Dance A 5 

0402 Ballet B 2 

0406 Modern Repertory IV 2 

»D420 Dance Production 2 

LA— Elective 3 



Total Credits: 133 



^Includes preparation for perfornance requirement. 



PERFORf'iANCE MAJOR 
THEATRE DANCE 



VI 



0311 Jazz Dance 


A 


5 


D301 Ballet B 




2 


0313 Tap I 




2 


0309 Partnering 




1 


OP317 Acting I 




1 


015 Electronic 


Music 


3 


LA350 Arts in Hi 


ist. 


3 



D312 Jazz Dance A 

D304 Modern Dance B 

D314 Tap II 

D322 Score Reconstruction 

0P318 Acting II 

D320 Improv. /Composition 

LA351 Aesthetics 



17 



5 
2 
2 
1 
1 
2 
3 

IT 



VII 



VIII 



0411 Jazz Dance A 


5 


0401 Ballet B 


2 


D413 Tap III 


2 


0419 Theatre Functions 


2 


0415 Voice I 


1 


LA-- Elective 


3 



0412 Jazz Dance A 5 

0404 Modern Dance B 2 

0414 Tap IV 2 

*D420 Dance Production 2 

0416 Voice II 1 

LA-- Elective 3 



15 



Total Credits: 133 
♦Includes preparation for performance requirement. 



DANCE PERFORMANCE 
ASSOCIATE DEGREE 



II 



D103 


Modern I 


3 


01 01 


Ballet I 


3 


D105 


Notation I 


1 


D107 


Eurythmics I 


1 


D-- 


Dance Elective* 


2 


DP101 


Functional Music I 


1 


Ml 01 


Intro. to Music I 


3 
14 



D104 


Modern Dance II 




D102 


Ballet II 




D106 


Notation II 




031 3 


Tap I 




0108 


Eurythmics II 




D-- 


Dance Elective* 




DP102 Functional Musk II 




M102 


Intro, to Music II 


16 



III 



D203 

D201 

D217 

D205 

D207 

0209 

D— 

0P201 



Modern III 


3 


Ballet III 


3 


Improvisation I 


1 


Notation III 


1 


Dance Pedagogy I 


2 


Anatomy for Dancers 


2 


Dance Elective* 


2 


Functional Music III 


1 




15 



IV 

Modern IV 
Ballet IV 
Improvisation II 
Dance Pedagogy II 
Kinesiology 
Dance Production ' 
Dance Elective 



D204 

0202 

0218 

0208 

0210 

0420 

0" 

0P202 Functional Music IV 



i 
3 
1 
2 
2 
2 
1 
1 
IS 



* Dance Electives: Dill Spanish. D112 Jazz. D114 Ethnic Dance, D115 Mime. 0116 Character 
** Includes preparation for performance requirement. 



Total Credits: 60 



SCHOOL OF DANCE 
DANCE EDUCATION MAJOR 



SEMESTER I 
SEMESTER III 



SEMESTER II 
SEMESTER IV 



FOLLOWS CORE CURRICULUM 



SEMESTER V 



SEMESTER VI 
FOLLOWS MAJOR AREA OF CONCENTRATION 



SEMESTER VII SEMESTER VIII 

FOLLOWS MAJOR AREA OF CONCENTRATION 
WITH THE FOLLOWING EXCEPTIONS: 



Liberal arts elective replaced 
with GE431 Ed. Psychology 



Liberal arts elective replaced 
with GE432 - Child Psychology 



SEMESTER IX 

*D501 Ballet A 5* 

*D503 Modern Dance A 5* 

*D511 Jazz Dance A 5* 

**DE501 Dance Education Seminar I 3 
DE503 El em. Rhythms & 

Creative Movement 3 

DE505 SociaVFolk/Square 3 

GE531 Society & Education _3 

17 



SEMESTER X 



'D502 


Ballet A 


5* 


'D504 


Modern Dance A 


5* 


D512 


Jazz Dance A 


5* 


DE502 


Dance Education 






Seminar II 


3 


DE510 


Student Teaching 


8 
16 



*Select only the one course from the major area. 
♦♦Includes outside observation/evaluation time. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



0101-102 

0201-202 

D301A-302A 

D401A-402A 

D301B-302B 

D401B-402B 

0501-502 



0103-104 
0203-204 



D303A-304A 
D303B-304B 
D403A-404A 
D403B-404B 
0503-504 



D105 
0106 
D205 



BALLET 

Technique taught according to a syllabus based upon the Vaganova 
method. Students will be offered continuous advancement and 
development from beginning to advanced levels. Those course 
numbers followed by the letter "A" are for students who are majoring 
In this dance form. These classes meet on a daily basis. Those 
course numbers followed by the letter "B" are for students who are 
majoring in one of the other areas of concentration. These courses 
meet twice weekly. The five hundred level courses are designed as 
maintenance level courses for those students enrolled in the B.F.A. 
Dance Education program. 

The first four semesters are included as part of the core curriculum. 
Successful completion of these levels is required of all dance majors. 
These courses serve as an introduction to and development of the 
basic ballet technique and vocabulary. Body placement and alignment 
Is stressed through the understanding and application of these basics. 

MODERN DANCE 

This two year course is part of the core curriculum and is required 
of all Dance majors. The course serves as an introduction and 
beginning development to the study and practice of modern dance 
techniques and improvisations. Fundamental movement vocabulary 
Is explored and developed as well as several stylistic approaches. 

MODERN DANCE 

This is an upper division two/three year course of study which 
Includes a variety of stylistic approaches to the development 
of a modern dance technique. Classes include sitting, standing, 
and across the floor movement combinations as warm-up and as 
phrases. Those courses which are followed by the letter "A" are 
for students majoring in this area and meet daily. The courses 
followed by letter "B" are for students majoring in another form 
of dance and meet twice weekly. The five hundered level courses 
are designed as maintenance level classes for those students 
enrolled in the B.F.A. Dance Education progi^am. 

NOTATION 

Notation I: Introduction to the Laban System of recording dance 
movement. Study of the basic notation symbols for reading and 
writing movements of the feet and arms. 

Notation II: Reading and writing dance movements involving steps, 
arms and leg gestures, turns, and rhythmic and spatial patterns. 

Notation III: Advanced study in reading and writing dance phrases 
including torso, parts of the limbs, and head. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



0107-108 EURYTHMICS 



A two semester course which examines and develops the student's 
perception and practice of rhythm through movement. The course 
introduces the student to the basics of musical rhythms by learning 
to write, to hear, and to perform. The first semester is devoted 
mostly to the theory while the second semester is designed for appli- 
cation to the dancer's performance. 



0110 DANCE ETHNOLOGY 



A one semester survey of the broad perspectives of dance as an 
expression of culture through an investigation of Western and 
non-Western dance forms. 



Dili SPANISH 



Study of the basic technique of playing castanets for the Sevillanas, 
and the basic footwork and handclaps of Flamenco. 



0112 JAZZ 



Each class employs floor stretches and center barre as warm-up 
procedure. The movement patterns that are learned emphasize 
simjltaneous coordination of more than one rhythmic pattern in 
different parts of the body. The combinations vary from simple to 
complex as the semester progresses. 



0113 TAP 



An introductory course to the practice of tap dancing and the basic 
vocabulary of this dance form. Primary emphasis is on the develop- 
ment of rhythmically accurate footwork and accompanying body and 
arm movements. 



0114 ETHNIC DANCE 



A pracrical survey course of dance forms, and styles including 
both Western and non-Western dance idioms. 



0115 MIME 



This course explores the Conmedia Del 'Arte, Kabuki, and the 20th 
Century techniques developed by Decroux, Barrault, and Marceau. 
Emphasis is placed on animals as our primal key to fundamental 
movement. Included in this course, however, is human movement with 
an analysis of age, environment, body-type, facial features, and 
movement. Included in this course, when appropriate, are: Master 
Classes by area and touring mimes; two study trips to the art museums 
(to study statues and period postures in paintings) and zoo; and 
films. 



-10- 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



0116 CHARACTER 



The study of the relationship between ethnic dance and classical 
ballet, and the proper technique for performing national dances 
stylized for the classical ballet repertory. 

D2D6 EFFORT/SHAPE 

This course is based on the concepts formulated by Rudolf Laban. It 
investigates these principles and provides the tools necessary for 
the observation, analysis, and recording of the dynamics and patterns 
of movement behavior applicable to the performer. 

D207-208 DANCE PEDAGOGY I and II 

Dance Pedagogy is a two semester course. The first semester serves 
as an introduction and the second semester is an application of the 
principles for the approaches to teaching dance. Basic concepts of 
teaching dance are identified and explored. An historical survey 
of the role of dance in education is included in the first semester. 

D209 ANATOMY FOR DANCERS 

A course designed to develop each student's awareness to his body's 
total potential (flexibility, strength, muscle tone and control 
through extension). This will be accomplished through the Harris 
Method of Conditioning - a natural conditioning program that works 
on correcting structural imbalances that inhibit flexibility and 
strength development throughout one's potential range of motion. 

D210 KINESIOLOGY 

Kinesiology is a unique combination or workbook study and physical 
application by experiencing structural movement potential in class. 

D211 DANCE HISTORY I 

Evaluation of dance as an art form in relation to the society of man. 
The evolution of dance from its "primitive" beginnings to its more 
"sophisticated" structuring. 

D212 DANCE HISTORY II 

A continuation of the approaches to the evaluation of the role of 
dance begun in Dance History I. The time period begins with the 
Middle Ages and continues into Contemporary times. 

D21 7-218 IMPROVISATION 

The Improvisation courses include breathing and centering warmups, 
isolation exercises, and technical improvisation on movement 
qualities, including swinging, gliding, falling, rising, slow motion, 
etc. 



•11- 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



D219-220 IMPROVISATION 

Individual improvisation is done on themes (example: massive, 
transparent, growing and withering, etc.)- This improvisation is 
done in restricted or altered spaces and times and to a specific 
music. 

Collective improvisation is done in twos, threes, and sometimes 
larger groups, using different structures of coranunication such as 
mirror, triangle, active-passive, crystallizations, etc. 

Both courses will focus on all three of the above described subject 
matters. Improvisation 218 includes exposure to "free group" 
improvisation with live music. 

0305-306 MODERN REPERTORY 

0405-406 

Experience in two types of repertory works each suited to the 
abilities of the students enrolled in the course: 1) Previously 
choreographed works; 2) New work choreographed specifically on 
members of the class (completed only to the degree permitted by time 
and skill limitations). This course provides experience in learning 
dances designed for specific performers other than the original 
cast as well as learning dances newly designed specifically on the 
performers doing the dance. 

Works previously choreographed and taught in this course will be 
selected from the repertories of various modern dance companies. 
These works will be taught by qualified instructors on a guest 
teaching basis when appropriate. 

D307 BALLET REPERTORY I 

Renaissance and Baroque 

The development of classical ballet from court dancers. Reconstruc- 
tion notation of period dancers. 

D308 BALLET REPERTORY I I -IV 

D407-408 

The study of major classical and modern ballets for the purpose 
of familiarizing the student with the standard ballet repertory. 
Excerpts from these ballets may be performed. 

0309-310 PARTNERING I and II 

The art of dancing with a partner taught according to the Bolshoi 
syllabus. The concentration in the second semester is upon 
learning a major classical pas de deux. 



-12- 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



0311-312 JAZZ DANCE 

0411-41 2 

0511-512 This is an upper division, two/three year theater dance major course. 
It is based on developing technique and repertory in this style of 
dance. The first courses contain basic rhythms and isolation exercises, 
and movement combinations stressing subtlety of dynamics. The re- 
maining two semesters continue to develop these basic practices and 
add the preparations of repertory. 

0313-314 TAP DANCE 

0413-414 

A two year course of study for theater dance majors. The four levels 
of tap dance contain the study and practice of this style of dance 
from simple rhythmic footwork to the application of more complex 
multi-rhythms and repertory. 

K315 ELECTRONIC MUSIC 

This course is for dance majors and serves as an introduction to 
the Moog Synthesizer. Students will learn to operate the synthesizer 
and be introduced to the basics of electronic music. This course is 
taught in co-operation with both the music and dance faculty. 

0P317-318 ACTING I and II 

A study of the fundamental skills developing characterizations; 
games and improvisation techniques are employed. Special emphasis 
is placed on the correlation between the physical and vocal. 

0317-318 COMPOSITION 

041 7 

Composition includes the analysis and study of a group choreography, 
the conception and composition of a solo, duet, or group dance by 
the student, and discussion and definition of ground rules of 
composition in Modern Dance. Each semester all of these aspects 
of the subject matter will be taught; the semesters will differ and 
progress in degrees of difficulty and complexity. 

D320 IMPROVISATION/COMPOSITION 

This course for Theater Dance majors contains a survey of methods and 
structures for creating movement patterns in the jazz dance style. 
These movement combinations are designed from both structured and 
non-structured frameworks. 

D322 SCORE RECONSTRUCTION 

The application of Kinetography Laban to the recreation of notated 
solo and/or small group works. This course may include performance 
experience of these reconstructed works at the discretion of the 
instructor. The works studied are established choreographer's and 
include composition in the various styles of dance - Modern, Ballet, 
and Theater Dance. 

-13- 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

D323-324 CHARACTER DANCE 

D325-326 

The students in this course will study the relationship between 
ethnic dance and classical ballet, and the proper technique for 
performing national dances stylized for the classical ballet and 
opera repertory. 

Complete barre work including: Plie, different battements, fond de 
jambe, fondu beat exercises in asymetric meter, etc., will be given. 

Different character dances from ballet and operas will be taught. 
Ex: "Mazurka Czardas" from Coppelia , "Neopolitan and Spanish" from 
Swan Lake and "Polonaise" from Eugene Onegln . 

D409 BALLET HISTORY 

The first part of this course focuses on the history of ballet from 
its origin to the end of the romantic era. The second period from 
circa 1900 (Diaghilev) to the contemporary ballet. 

0415-416 VOICE I and II 

A two semester course designed to give the dancer a familiarity 
with fundamental principles and exercises to establish the control 
and quality of the performer's voice and vocal expression. The 
course includes singing and choral techniques. 

D419 THEATER FUNCTIONS 

A basic introduction and integration of lighting, costuming and make- 
up for Dance, including practical experience via completed projects. 
Also included are scene design theory and the making and handling 
of stage properties related to dance. 

D420 DANCE PRODUCTION 

This course is required of all students and is designed to assist 
in meeting the performance requirement for graduation. Each student 
will participate in the rehearsal, performance, and technical aspects 
for the annual graduation concert which is held each Spring. Students 
are expected to take major responsibilities for the production of 
this program. 

DE501 DANCE EDUCATION SEMINAR I 

A course designed specifically for those students who will be com- 
pleting their student teaching requirement in the following semester. 
The course includes observation techniques, source material preparation, 
and evaluation criteria. Discussion sessions center around the 
application of dance principles to the learning situation. The role 
of dance teacher Is examined. 



• 14- 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



DE502 



DANCE EDUCATION SEMINAR II 



DE503 



DE505 



DE510 



DPI 01 -102 
DP201 -202 



GE531 



GE432 



This course is designed to compliment the actual student teaching 
experience. Specific situations, problems, and achievements of the 
student teaching process are discussed and evaluated. 

ELEMENTARY RHYTHM/CREATIVE MOVEMENT 

This course is to be taken by dance education majors prior to the 
student teaching semester. It contains rhythmical activities and 
movement approaches appropriate to the elementary school child and 
is designed to build an awareness of time, space, and energy concepts 
in children in order to develop effective movement habits. Students 
acquire skills in the teaching of these activities and are given 
leadership experience in the classroom situation. 

SOCIAL/ FOLK/SQUARE DANCE 

This course contains the basic skills and examples of these three 
dance forms. Each area is presented as a unit. The material included 
in this course is designed for both elementary and secondary school 
level. Students are given classroom leadership experience in these 
areas. The course must be taken prior to the student teaching 
semester. 

STUDENT TEACHING 

By arrangements with the Dance Co-ordinator of the Philadelphia 
Board of Education and local schools. Students teach under supervised 
director for one semester and participate in the daily school routine. 
If placement for student teaching is not within the school system, 
arrangements are made for the students to do this supervised teaching 
through local dance studios. Student Teaching must be taken con- 
currently with 0E502. Pre-requisite: DE501 . 

FUNCTIONAL MUSIC I, II, III, IV 

One one-hour period per week of class instruction. Elementary 
piano for Dance Majors with emphasis upon musicianship, music 
fundamentals, and technical skills. 

SOCIETY AND EDUCATION 

An examination of the role of education in society, its relation 
to the economic, social, political, and cultural life of a contnunity 
or nation. These relationships are viewed with some historical 
perspective and in light of the contemporary settings and issues. 

CHILD PSYCHOLOGY 

General principles. Influences on growth, sense perception, emotion. 
Memory development, imagination and creative activity. 



•15- 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

GE431 EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY 

Psychology of learning and teaching processes. Personality as a 
function of education. Child development, individual differences, 
psychological adjustment related to education. Educational measure- 
ments. This course is prerequisite for GE432. 

LA150 COM>OSING: A COURSE IN WRITING 

This course will employ the methods of Macrorie, Coles and Butler. 
On the assumption that bad writing is less a matter of grammar, 
spelling or even of "outlines" than it is a matter of engagement 
and on the assumption that the bad writer is basically a dishonest 
writer (although that dishonesty is often confused with an idea of 
"giving the Instructor what he wants") this course helps the writer 
locate a voice and also helps him recognize what it means to have a 
real subject. 

The readings In the course are used as examples of the act of com- 
position and not as means for generating discussion of ideas, themes. 
Issues and so forth although obviously such discussion is sometimes 
necessary. The texts, for the most part, will be the actual pieces 
of writing produced by the students themselves. The students will 
be asked to write on a regular basis. 

The aims of the course are several: To demonstrate that writing is 
a recognizable and achievable skill, to let the student discover that 
he has something to say in a distinctive way, and to show that writing 
can be an engaging albeit difficult and sometimes frustrating 
activity. 

LA151 WAYS OF WRITING ABOUT LITERATURE 

This course is not in itself a survey of genres or of literary 
history, although the superficial structure of the course might be 
based on such a model; but rather, the course will concern itself 
with the question of how does one respond to a piece of literature. 

Since there are a number of approaches to literature, too many to be 
covered in a one semester course in any depth, the particular methods 
as well as the particular works employed in the course will vary with 
the instructor; but it is important that the student be introduced to 
and be given practical applications for several ways of approaching 
literary works. 

The student will have already had some exposure to literature in 
LAISO but only as models for their own writing. In this course the 
aims are to show that there are a number of different (and "correct") 
ways of responding to literature and that these approaches can be 
mastered with a certain degree of skill. It is also hoped that the 
student will see that these approaches can be applied to non-literary 
arts as well. 



- 16 - 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

LA250 PERSONALITY AND CREATIVITY 

The concerns of this course are twofold: to provide a general ov- 
erview of some major theories of personality and human development 
and to see what relevance these theories might have in understand- 
ing or explaining the phenomenon of the creative artist. 

LA251 SCIENCE AND THE ARTS 

The aim of this course is to give artists who want to know how sci- 
ence affects our culture some idea of how science grew up. We 
shall read J. Bronowski 's The Ascent of Man and discuss such subjects 
as the origins of man and his culture, his interest in materials 
and the growth of metallurgy and chemistry, his interest in mechanics 
and astronomy and the growth of physics, and his interest in the 
world of nature and the growth of biology and medicine. Several 
papers and a journal will be required, in which the student is 
expected to develop an ability to handle simple scientific and 
philosophical concepts in a clear and readable fashion. 

LA350 HISTORY OF THE ARTS 

This course will be a survey of Western art with as much cross in- 
dexing of the various arts as possible. It will also attempt to 
integrate as much as possible social and intellectual history into 
the discussions of various movements, styles and artists. 

Again it is hoped that this course will feed off of the earlier 
courses in the sequence and reinforce the skills learned there. 

LA351 AESTHETICS 

This course, it is hoped, will grow out of the concerns of the first 
two years. The basic questions: What is the nature of art? How 
is it defined? Can it be defined? Where is the work of art located? 
Is there such a thing as an aesthetic experience? will be asked. 

Students will be asked to read the major attempts to answer these 
as well as other questions and to apply them to specific works and 
events. 

LA450 ELECTIVES 

The electives, as opposed to the first three years of the sequence, 
should be more fluid, perhaps more experimental, and certainly more 
responsive to the desires of the students. They can be approached 
from a variety of points of views. They can be seen as extensions 
of the history course or the aesthetics course. They could concen- 
trate on a single important question, or a major figure in the arts 
or influential on the arts, e.g. Freud, Marx, Levi-Strauss, or 



17- 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

LA450 ELECTIVES (continued) 

they could grow out of the shared interests of a team of Instructors 
working In different areas. These courses would have no necessary 
permanence about them and could change radically from year to 
year. 

MlOl- INTRODUCTION TO MUSIC (3-3 cr.) 

102 

This is a required course 1n the Core Curriculum designed to 
familiarize dance students with the musical literature of various 
musical periods, especially that of dance music. Other topics 
to be discussed are various kinds of imjsical materials, musical 
structures and the tenporal aspects of music. 



18- 



INDEX 



DEGREE PROGRAMS 

Bachelor of Fine Arts 1 

Bach, of Fine Arts in Dance Ed. 1 

Associate Degree 2 



CURRICULUM 

Core Curriculum 3 

Ballet Major 4 

Modern Dance Major 5 

Theater Dance Major 6 

Associate Degree 7 

Dance Education Major 8 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

Acting 13 

Dance 9-15 

Electronic Music 13 

Functional Music 15 

General Education 15-16 

Intro, to Music 18 

Liberal Arts 16-18 

Voice 14 




COLLEGE OF THE 
PEF(FOF^II^ A^S 

SCHOOL OF DANCE 



FACULTY BIOGRAPHIES 



BALLET 

IRENE CLARKE— Graduate, Combs College of Music and the 
Philadelphia Dance Academy. Additional studies at the Jeffrey Ballet 
Company School, the American Ballet Theatre, and the Kirov Ballet in the 
Soviet Union with Natalie Dudynskaya. A former member of the faculty at 
the Settlement Music School, Ms. Clarke choreographed dances for a Robin 
Hood Dell performance of La Traviata. 

SUSAN D. GOTTLIEB— B.S. in Economics, The Wharton School. 
Studied with Margaret Craske at the Metropolitan Opera House and at the 
Harkness House for Ballet Arts. She also studied at the Stuttgart Ballet in 
Germany for one year. Ms. Gottlieb has performed with the Downtown 
Ballet Company in New York and in productions of CARMEN and LUCIA 
with the Philadelphia Opera Company. 

ANDREW PAP— Studied at Licoul Pedogogic Universitar and Scoala de 
Coreografie in Romania. He has conducted independent study and research 
of ethnic historical dance. He is also on the faculty of the Pennsylvania Ballet 
School. Mr. Pap is a former member of the Romanian State Opera and Ballet, 
has taught at Scoala de Coregrafie, the Italian Dancers Union, the Saratoga 
Ballet Center, and the International Dance Center in Rome.